Towards a Full Bibliography (Content)

Part A : Music

A.1. ‘The Twa Corbies’, Music and
Letters
, vol.I, no.2 (March 1920), pp.171-175.

    Words taken from an anonymous Border Ballad. See A.29
    and A.35.

A.2. Captain Stratton’s Fancy
(London: Stainer & Bell Ltd., 1920).

    Words by John Masefield. Dedicated to ‘F.W. Harvey, Singer of this song
    in many Prison Camps’. Probably published in the first half of 1920.
    Gurney notes in a letter of 9 February 1920 that the ‘Old Bold Mate’ –
    the song’s nickname – is ‘still keelhauled!’, suggesting that its
    appearance was imminent; see D.5, p.501.

A.3. Five Elizabethan Songs with Piano:
Under the Greenwood Tree
(London: Winthrop Rogers Ltd., 1920).

    Words by William Shakespeare. This and the following four songs, called ‘the Elizas’ by Gurney, were probably published in the first half of 1920. Gurney notes in a letter of 10 October that ‘the first edition of some of the Elizas’ have already sold out; see D.5, p.503. All
    five were dedicated to ‘Emmy Hunt’ and reprinted in a collected edition
    as A.38.
    Notices and reviews of the ‘Elizas’:
    A.3.1. A[rthur] W[alter] K[ramer], ‘Introducing a Young English
    Composer’, Musical America, 27 November 1920, p.34.
    A.3.2. William Child, ‘Songs’, The Musical Times, vol.62,
    no.936 (February 1921), p.113.

A.4. Five Elizabethan Songs with Piano:
Orpheus
(London: Winthrop Rogers Ltd., 1920).

    Words by William Shakespeare.

A.5. Five Elizabethan Songs with Piano:
Spring
(London: Winthrop Rogers Ltd., 1920).

    Words by Thomas Nashe.
    Notice:
    A.5.1. unsigned, ‘Ivor Gurney sets Thomas Nashe’s “Spring”‘, Musical
    America
    , 22 January 1921.

A.6. Five Elizabethan Songs with Piano:
Tears
(London: Winthrop Rogers Ltd., 1920).

    Words taken from an anonymous Elizabethan lyric.

A.7. Five Elizabethan Songs with Piano:
Sleep
(London: Winthrop Rogers Ltd., 1920).

    Words by John Fletcher.

A.8. ‘Desire in Spring’, The Chapbook
(A Monthly Miscellany)
, No.18 (December 1920), pp.16-23.

    Words by Francis Ledwidge. This issue of The Chapbook also
    included new songs by Malcolm Davidson and Scott Goddard and all three
    have been reprinted as Three New Songs: Music by Malcolm Davidson,
    Scott Goddard and Ivor Gurney
    (Kraus Reprint Corporation, 1967).
    See A.25 and A.35 for other
    reprints of this song.

A.9. Carol of the Skiddaw Yowes
(London: Boosey & Co., 1920).

    Words by Ernest Casson. Dedicated to ‘J[ohn] W[ilton] H[aines]’.
    Although the published score attributes the text to Ernest Casson, the poet’s name was Edmund Casson.

A.10.
Since thou, O fondest and truest (London: Boosey & Co.,
1921).

    Words by Robert Bridges and dedicated to him. Probably published in the
    first half of 1921. Gurney wrote to Bridges on 18 February 1921 saying
    that he had received the ‘first proof’ of the song and asking
    permission to dedicate it to him; see D.5, p.508.

A.11.
The County Mayo (London: Winthrop Rogers Ltd., 1921).

    Words by Raferty in James Stephens’s translation. Dedicated to Mrs.
    Taylor. This and the following song were due to be published in the
    second half of 1921. Gurney wrote to John Haines on 1 July 1921 to ask
    if he could send him copies of the words as they were to be published
    ‘before long’; see D.5, p.501.
    Review:
    A.11.1. H.G., The Musical Times, vol.63,
    no.948 (February 1922), p.114.

A.12.
The Bonnie Earl of Murray (London: Winthrop Rogers Ltd., 1921).

    Words taken from an anonymous Scots ballad. Dedicated to Mrs.
    Waterhouse.

A.13.
Five Preludes for Piano (London: Winthrop Rogers Ltd., 1921).

    Contents: Prelude in F sharp major (dedicated to Sir Charles Stanford),
    Prelude in A minor (dedicated to Gerald James), Prelude in D flat
    (dedicated to Mrs. Chapman), Prelude in F sharp (dedicated to Sydney
    Shimmin) and Prelude in D (dedicated to ‘Winnie’ – Winifred Chapman).
    Review:
    A.13.1. H.G., The Musical Times vol.62, no.945 (November 1921),
    p.781.

A.14.
West Sussex Drinking Song (London: Chappell & Co., 1921).

    Words by Hilaire Belloc. Dedicated to ‘F[rederick] W[illiam] H[arvey] (Comrade to many in Captivity)’.

A.15.
I will go with my father a-ploughing (London: Boosey & Co.,
1921).

    Words by Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil. Dedicated to ‘Miss Marion Scott’.

A.16.
Come, O come, my Life’s delight (London: Boosey & Co., 1922).

    Words by Thomas Campion. Dedicated to Frederick Saxty.

A.17.
Edward, Edward (London: Stainer & Bell Ltd., 1922).

    Words taken from an annonymous ballad in Percy’s Reliques of
    English Poetry
    (1765). Dedicated to ‘A[lfred] H[unter] Cheesman’.

A.18.
Five Western Watercolours: for the Pianoforte (London: Stainer
& Bell Ltd., 1923).

    Contents: ‘Twyver River’, ‘Alney Island’, ‘The Old Road’, ‘Still
    Meadows’, and ‘Sugar Loaf Hill’. Dedicated to ‘Miss Marjorie Chapman’.

A.19. The Carnegie Collection of
British Music: Ludlow and Teme: Song-Cycle for Tenor Voice, String
Quartet and Pianoforte
(London: Stainer & Bell Ltd., 1923).

    Words by A.E. Housman from A Shropshire Lad.
    Contents: ‘When
    smoke stood up from Ludlow’, ‘Far in a western brookland’, ”Tis time,
    I think’, ‘Ludlow Fair’, ‘On the idle hill of summer’, ‘When I was one
    and twenty’ and ‘The Lent Lily’. Dedicated ‘To the memory of Margaret
    Hunt.’ Published under the auspices of the Carnegie Trust. See A.36 and J.1.
    Notices:
    A.19.1. unsigned, ‘The Carnegie Trust’, The Musical Times,
    vol.62, no.940 (June 1921), p.465.

A.20.
‘Lights Out’, The London Mercury, Vol.XI, no.61 (November
1924), pp.20-23.

    Words by Edward Thomas. The title song of Gurney’s Thomas song-cycle, which was to be published in 1926 (A.23).
    This text has a slightly different ending to the version in A.23.

A.21.
Sowing (London: Stainer & Bell Ltd., 1925).

    Words by Edward Thomas. Dedicated to ‘H[erbert] N[orman] Howells’.

A.22.
The Carnegie Collection of British Music: The Western Playland (and
of sorrow): Song-Cycle for Baritone Voice, String Quartet and Pianoforte

(London: Stainer & Bell Ltd., 1926).

    Words by A.E. Housman.
    Contents: ‘Reveille’, ‘Loveliest of trees’, ‘Golden Friends’, ‘Twice a week’, ‘The Aspens’, ‘Is my team
    ploughing?’, ‘The Far Country’ and ‘March’. Dedicated to
    ‘”Hawthornden”‘ [Annie Nelson Drummond]. Published under the auspices
    of the Carnegie Trust. See A.37 and J.3.
    Notices and reviews:
    A.22.1. unsigned, ‘Carnegie United Kingdom Trust’, The Musical Times,
    vol.65, no.976 (June 1924), p.558.
    A.22.2. unsigned, ‘The Carnegie Trustees have announced…’, The
    London Mercury
    , vol.X, no.56 (June 1924), p.342.
    A.22.3. unsigned, ‘Mr. Ivor Gurney’, The London Evening Standard,
    1 May 1926, p.6.
    A.22.4. unsigned, ‘Music of Today: Recent Carnegie Works’, The
    Liverpool Post and Mercury
    , 24 May 1926.
    A.22.5. unsigned, ‘The Carnegie Music: Chamber Works and Opera’, The
    Times
    , 8 January 1927, p.8.
    A.22.6. unsigned, ‘Ivor Gurney’s Song Cycles’, unidentified
    Gloucestershire newspaper, circa January 1927 (GA75.4.8).

A.23.
Lights Out: Poems by Edward Thomas. Music by Ivor Gurney
(London: Stainer & Bell Ltd., 1926).

    Contents: ‘The Penny Whistle’ (dedicated to ‘the 2/5th Gloucesters’),
    ‘Scents’, ‘Bright Clouds’, ‘Lights Out’ (the dedication reads
    ‘I.M.-M.H.’ – in memory of Margaret Hunt), ‘Will you come?’ and ‘The
    Trumpet’. The cycle as a whole is dedicated to ‘Minsterworth’. See also
    A.20.

A.24.
Star-Talk (London: Stainer & Bell Ltd., 1927).

    Words by Robert Graves.

A.25.
Desire in Spring (London: Oxford University Press, 1928).

    Words by Francis Ledwidge. See A.8 and A.35.
    Reviews:
    A.25.1. T.A., The Musical Times, vol.69, no.1026 (August 1928),
    pp.702-703.
    A.25.2. Sc.G., ‘Reviews of Music’, Music and Letters, Vol.IX,
    no.4 (October 1928), p.339.

A.26.
Walking Song (London: Oxford University Press, 1928).

    Words by F.W. Harvey. See A.35.

A.27.
The Fields are Full (London: Oxford University Press, 1928).

    Words by Edward Shanks. See A.35.

A.28.
Severn Meadows (London: Oxford University Press, 1928).

    Words by Ivor Gurney. The dedication reads: ‘Written for Miss Dorothy
    Dawe (Dorothy Howells)’. See A.35.

A.29.
The Twa Corbies: A Border Ballad (London: Oxford University
Press, 1928).

    Dedicated in this printing to Sir Hubert Parry. See A.1
    and A.35.

A.30.
Ivor Gurney: Twenty Songs. Volume 1: 1-10. (London: Oxford
University Press, 1938).

    Contents: ‘The Singer’ (Edward Shanks), ‘The Latmian Shepherd’ (Edward
    Shanks), ‘Black Stitchel’ (Wilfrid Gibson), ‘Down by the Salley
    Gardens’ (W.B. Yeats), ‘All Night under the Moon’ (Wilfrid Gibson),
    ‘Nine of the Clock’ (‘John Doyle’ [Robert Graves]), ‘You are my Sky’
    (J.C. Squire), ‘Ha’nacker Mill’ (Hilaire Belloc), ‘When Death to either
    shall come’ (Robert Bridges) and ‘Cathleen Ni Houlihan’ (W.B. Yeats).
    Also included is a Preface by Marion Scott.
    Notices and reviews:
    A.30.1. unsigned,’Songs by Ivor Gurney’, The
    Times
    , 30 December 1937, p.8.
    A.30.2. R[ichard] C[apell], ‘New Gurney Songs: An English Garland’, The
    Daily Telegraph
    , circa January 1938.
    A.30.3. Ernest Walker, ‘Ivor Gurney’s Songs’, The Monthly Musical
    Record
    , vol.68, no.798 (July/August 1938), p.170.
    A.30.4. A.H.,’Reviews of Music: Songs’, The Musical Times,
    vol.79, no.1146 (August 1938), p.597.
    A.30.5. Edmund Rubbra, ‘Twenty Songs’, Music and Letters,
    vol.XIX, no.4 (October 1938), pp.472-473.

A.31.
Ivor Gurney: Twenty Songs. Volume 2: 11-20. (London: Oxford
University Press, 1938).

    Contents: ‘The Scribe’ (Walter de la Mare), ‘The Boat is Chafing’ (John
    Davidson), ‘Bread and Cherries’ (Walter de la Mare), ‘An Epitaph’
    (Walter de la Mare), ‘Blaweary’ (Wilfrid Gibson), ‘A Sword’ (Robin
    Flower), ‘The Folly of Being Comforted’ (W.B. Yeats), ‘Hawk and Buckle’
    (‘John Doyle’ [Robert Graves]), ‘Last Hours’ (John Freeman) and
    ‘Epitaph in Old Mode’ (J.C. Squire). Also included is Marion
    Scott’s Preface from A.30.

A.32.
Two Pieces for Violin and Piano: 1. The Apple Orchard. 2. Scherzo.
(London: Oxford University Press, 1940).

    Reviews:
    A.32.1. unsigned, ‘Two Pieces for Violin and Piano’, The Monthly
    Musical Record
    , vol.70, no.814 (November 1940), pp.208-209.
    A.32.2. unsigned, ‘Two Pieces for Violin and Piano’, The Musical
    Times
    , vol.82, no.1175 (January 1941), p.25.
    A.32.3. Edmund Rubbra, ‘Two Pieces for Violin and Piano’, Music and
    Letters
    , vol.XXII, no.1 (January 1941), p.95.

A.33. Ivor Gurney: A Third Volume of
Ten Songs
(London: Oxford University Press, 1952).

    Contents: ‘Shepherd’s Song’ (Ben Jonson), ‘The Happy Tree’ (Gerald
    Gould), ‘The Cherry Trees’ (Edward Thomas), ‘I Shall Ever be Maiden’
    (Sappho in Bliss Carman’s version), ‘Ploughman Singing’ (John Clare,
    dedicated to Clare’s editor, Edmund Blunden), ‘I Praise the Tender
    Flower’ (Robert Bridges), ‘Snow’ (Edward Thomas), ‘Thou Didst Delight
    Mine Eyes’ (Robert Bridges), ‘The Ship’ (J.C. Squire), and ‘Goodnight
    to the Meadow’ (‘John Doyle’ [Robert Graves]). This volume also
    includes Marion Scott’s preface from A.30 with an
    additional postscript by her.
    Reviews:
    A.33.1. unsigned, ‘Ivor Gurney: A Third Volume of Ten Songs’, Musical
    Opinion
    , vol.76, no.907 (April 1953), p.417.
    A.33.2. unsigned, ‘Ivor Gurney: A Third Volume of Ten Songs’, The
    Musical Times
    , vol.94, no.1323 (May 1953), p.174.
    A.33.3. Joan Gray, ‘Ivor Gurney: A Third Volume of Ten Songs’, The
    Royal College of Music Magazine
    , vol.XLIX, no.3 (June 1953), p.47.
    A.33.4. Ivor Keys, ‘Ivor Gurney: A Third Volume of Ten Songs’, Music
    and Letters
    , vol.XXXIV, no.3 (July 1953), p.267.
    A.33.5. Edmund Rubbra, ‘Ivor Gurney: A Third Volume of Ten Songs’, The
    Monthly Musical Record
    , vol.83, no.876 (May 1953), p.105.

A.34.
Ivor Gurney: A Fourth Volume of Ten Songs (London: Oxford
University Press, 1959).

    Contents: ‘Even Such is Time’ (Sir Walter Raleigh), ‘Brown is my Love’
    (words from an anonymous Elizabethan lyric; now known to be a translation of Torquato Tasso’s ‘Bruna sei tu ma bella’, first published in Nicholas Yonge’s Musica Transalpina (1597)), ‘Love Shakes my Soul’
    (Sappho in Bliss Carman’s version), ‘Most Holy Night’ (Hilaire Belloc),
    ‘To Violets’ (Robert Herrick), ‘On the Downs’ (John Masefield), ‘A
    Piper’ (Seumas O’Sullivan), ‘Cradle Song’ (W.B. Yeats), ‘The Fiddler of
    Dooney’ (W.B. Yeats) and ‘In Flanders’ (F.W. Harvey). Also included is
    a Preface by Howard Ferguson.
    Reviews:
    A.34.1. Ivor Keys, ‘Ivor Gurney: A Fourth Volume of Ten Songs’, Music
    and Letters
    , vol.XLI, no.1 (January 1960), p.102.
    A.34.2. unsigned, ‘Ivor Gurney: A Fourth Volume of Ten Songs’, The
    Monthly Musical Record
    , vol.90, no.956 (January/February 1960),
    p.33.
    A.34.3. David Money, ‘Ivor Gurney: A Fourth Volume of Ten Songs’, The
    Musical Times
    , vol.CI, no.1402 (March 1960), p.164.

A.35.
Ivor Gurney: A Fifth Volume of Ten Songs, edited by Michael Hurd
(London: Oxford University Press, 1979).

    Contents: ‘By a Bierside’ (John Masefield), ‘Desire in Spring’ (Francis
    Ledwidge), ‘Severn Meadows’ (Ivor Gurney), ‘Song of Ciabhan’ (Ethna
    Carbery), ‘The Apple Orchard’ (Sappho in Bliss Carman’s version), ‘The
    Cloths of Heaven’ (W.B. Yeats), ‘The Fields are Full’ (Wilfrid Gibson),
    ‘The Night of Trafalgar’ (Thomas Hardy), ‘The Twa Corbies’ (Border
    Ballad) and ‘Walking Song’ (F.W. Harvey).
    Much of this collection is reprinted songs. See A.1,
    A.8, A.26, A.27
    and A.28.
    Reviews:
    A.35.1. Stephen Banfield, ‘Songs New and Older’, The Musical Times,
    vol.CXXIII, no.1678 (December 1982), p.46.
    A.35.2. Trevor Hold, ‘Ivor Gurney: A Fifth Volume of Ten Songs’, The
    Music Review
    , vol.45, no.2 (May 1984), pp.160-161.

A.36.
Ludlow and Teme: A Song-Cycle to Poems of A.E. Housman by Ivor
Gurney for Tenor and Piano
, with an introduction by Michael
Pilkington (London: Stainer & Bell Ltd., 1982).

    A vocal score reprint of Gurney’s first Carnegie Award winning song
    cycle. See also A.19.
    Reviews:
    A.36.1. Stephen Banfield, ‘Gurney, Ivor: Ludlow
    and Teme & The Western Playland’, Music and Letters,
    vol.LXV, no.4 (1984), pp.203-204.
    A.36.2. Ruth L. Drucker, ‘Ivor Gurney: Ludlow and Teme & The
    Western Playland’, Notes, vol.42, no.4 (June 1986), p.865.

A.37.
The Western Playland (and of sorrow): A Song-Cycle to Poems of A.E.
Housman by Ivor Gurney for Baritone and Piano
, with an introduction
by Michael Pilkington (London: Stainer & Bell Ltd., 1982).

    A vocal score reprint of Gurney’s second Carnegie Award winning song
    cycle.
    See also A.22.

A.38.
Five Elizabethan Songs: for Low Voice and Piano (London: Boosey
& Hawkes, 1983).

    A single-volume reprint of Gurney’s ‘Elizas’, originally published as A.3 to A.7.
    Reviews:
    A.38.1. Peter J. Pirie, ‘English Songs’, The Musical Times,
    vol.CXXIV, no.1688 (September 1983), p.555.
    A.38.2. George Newton, ‘Ivor Gurney: Five Elizabethan Songs’, NATS
    Bulletin
    , January/February 1985, p.46.

A.39. Ivor Gurney: Twenty Favourite
Songs
, compiled by Neil Jenkins. (Oxford: Oxford University Press,
1997).

    A compilation of Gurney’s ‘best known and most frequently sung’
    settings which includes ‘All Night Under the Moon’, ‘The Apple
    Orchard’, ‘Black Stitchel’, ‘Brown is my Love’, ‘The Cloths of Heaven’,
    ‘Desire in Spring’, ‘Down by the Salley Gardens’, ‘An Epitaph’, ‘Even
    Such is Time’, ‘The Fields are Full’, ‘I Praise the Tender Flower’,
    ‘Most Holy Night’, ‘A Piper’, ‘The Scribe’, ‘Severn Meadows’, ‘The
    Singer’, ‘Snow’, ‘To Violets’ and ‘Walking Song’.

A.40. Ivor Gurney: Eleven Songs for
Medium Voice and Piano
, edited by Michael Hurd, Anthony Boden and
Christian Wilson (London: Thames Publishing, 1998).

    Includes two previously unpublished songs, ‘On your Midnight Pallet’
    and ‘Cock-Crow’, a previously unpublished version of ‘Sowing’ (edited by Richard Carder), plus
    ‘Since thou, O Fondest and Truest’, ‘Come, O come my Life’s Delight’,
    ‘The Bonnie Earl of Murray’, ‘The County Mayo’, ‘West Sussex Drinking
    Song’, ‘Captain Stratton’s Fancy’, ‘Edward, Edward’ and ‘Star-Talk’.

A.41. Seven Sappho Songs, for Soprano
and Piano. Poems by Bliss Carman, Music by Ivor Gurney
, edited by
Richard Carder, with a note on Carman Bliss by Michael Hurd (London:
Thames Publishing, 2000).

    Contains the following songs’: ‘Soft was the wind’, ‘I shall be ever
    maiden’, ‘The Apple Orchard’, ‘Hesperus’, ‘Love shakes my soul’, ‘The
    Quiet Mist’, ‘Lonely Night’.

A.42. Preludes and Nocturnes for piano
solo
, edited by Jennifer Partridge. (London: Thames Publishing,
2004).

    Review: A.42.1. Richard Carder. Ivor Gurney Society Journal
    vol.10, 2004, pp.95-97.

See also J.22 and J.29, both of which reproduce previously
unpublished songs by Gurney.

Part B : Poetry

B.1. ‘Afterwards’ and ‘To the Poet Before
Battle’, The Royal College of Music Magazine, Volume XII,
Number 1 (Christmas Term 1915).

B.2. ‘To Certain Comrades (E.S. AND J.H.)’,
The Royal College of Music Magazine, Volume XII, Number 3
(Midsummer Term 1916), p.78.

B.3. ‘Song of Pain and Beauty’, The
Royal College of Music Magazine
, Volume XIII, Number 3 (Midsummer
Term 1917).

B.4. Severn & Somme: by Ivor
Gurney. Private, of the Gloucesters
(London: Sidgwick &
Jackson, 1917)

    Gurney’s first published collection of poetry, consisting 46 poems and
    a Preface. Reprinted in March 1919. Republished in a critical edition
    with B.11 as B.44.
    Reviews:
    B.4.1. E. B. Osborn, ‘A Voluntary’, The Morning Post, November
    1917.
    B.4.2. unsigned, ‘Severn and Somme by Ivor Gurney, Private of the
    Gloucesters’, The Times Literary Supplement, Number 828 (22
    November 1917), p.571.
    B.4.3. ‘Solomon Eagle’ [J. C. Squire], ‘New Books’, The New
    Statesman and Nation
    , 24 November 1917, p.188.
    B.4.4. ‘Severn & Somme’, The Gloucester Journal, 1
    December 1917.
    B.4.5. John W. Haines, ‘Reviewer reviewed’, The Gloucester Journal,
    8 December 1917; a letter from Haines responding to what he regarded an
    unfair criticism of Gurney in B.4.4.
    B.4.6. unsigned, ‘Another Gloucestershire Lad’, The Sunday Times,
    9 December 1917.
    B.4.7. unsigned, ‘Two Books of Verse’, The Times Literary Supplement,
    Number 841 (28 February 1918), p.101.
    B.4.8. Marion M. Scott, ‘Severn and Somme. By Ivor Gurney’, The
    Royal College of Music Magazine
    , Volume XIV, Number 1 (Christmas
    Term, 1918), pp.24-25.

B.5. ‘Ypres’ and ‘After Music’, The
Royal College of Music Magazine
, Volume XIV, Number 2 (Easter Term
1918), p.48.

B.5.a. Excerpt from ‘Firelight’, Christian
Science Monitor
, 22 May 1918, p.19.

    The first eight lines of the poem by “Ivor Gurney, Private, of the
    Gloucesters’. This is the first known publication of Gurney in the
    United States.

B.5.b. Excerpt from ‘Song at Morning’, Christian
Science Monitor
, 28 May 1918, p.17.

    The first four lines of the poem are published.

B.6. ‘The Immortal Hour’, The
Westminster Gazette
, June 1918.

B.7. ‘The Battalion is Now “On Rest”‘, The
Spectator
, Volume 121, Number 4719 (7 December 1918), p.665.

B.8. ‘The Day of Victory: November 11th
1918’, The Gloucester Journal,
11 January 1919.

B.9. ‘In a Ward’, The Spectator,
Volume 122, Number 4724 (11 January 1919), p.39.

B.10.
‘The Volunteer’, The Spectator,
Volume 122, Number 4730 (22 February 1919), p.230.

B.11.
War’s Embers and Other Verses: by Ivor Gurney (London: Sidgwick
&
Jackson, [March] 1919)

    Gurney’s second volume of poetry consisting of 58 poems. Reprinted in a
    critical edition with B.4. as B.44.
    Reviews:
    B.11.1. unsigned, ‘War’s Embers and Other Verses’, The Athenaeum,
    Number 4646 (16 May 1919), p.349.
    B.11.2. F.W. Harvey, ‘Mr. Gurney’s New Book’, The Gloucester Journal,
    17 May 1919.
    B.11.3. Charles Wells, ‘Written in a Library’, The Bristol Times
    and Mirror
    , 31 May 1919.
    B.11.4. unsigned, ‘Short Notices of War’s Embers’, The Liverpool
    Post and Mercury
    , 4 June 1919.
    B.11.5. unsigned, The Aberdeen Daily Journal, 16 June 1919.
    B.11.6. unsigned, The Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard, 21
    June 1919.
    B.11.7. unsigned, ‘Some War Verse’, The Birmingham Post, 8 July
    1919.
    B.11.8. unsigned, ‘Outer And Inner’, The Times Literary Supplement, Number 916
    (7 August 1919), p.421.
    B.11.9. unsigned, ‘Our Library Table’, The Stroud Journal,
    circa summer 1919.

B.12.
‘In a Ward’, Public Health Nurse [USA], Volume 12 (February 1920), p.166.

B.13.
‘The Hooligan’ and ‘April 20th 1919’, The Royal College of Music
Magazine
, Volume XVI, Number 3 (Midsummer Term 1920), pp.9-10.

    ‘April 20th 1919’ is reprinted in I.91. and B.47.
    under the title ‘I Have Seen Well Today’.

B.14.
‘Equal Mistress’ and ‘The Crocus Ring’, Music and Letters, Volume I,
Number 4 (October 1920), pp.283-284.

B.15.
‘Fine Rain’, The Nation, Volume 28, Number 20 (12 February 1921), p.664.

B.16.
‘Western Sky’, The Nation and Athenaeum, Volume 29, Number 21 (20
August 1921), p.738.

B.17.
‘This City’, The Gloucester Journal, 7 January 1922, p.5.

B.18.
‘On a Two Hundredth Birthday’, The Gloucester Journal, 15 April 1922,
p.1.

B.19.
‘Tewkesbury’, The Gloucester Journal, 10 June 1922, p.8.

B.20.
‘Encounters’ and ‘The March Past’, The London Mercury, Volume VI,
Number 36 (October 1922), pp.569-570.

B.21.
‘Sights’, The London Mercury, Volume VII, Number 39 (January 1923),
p.241.

B.22.
‘The Road’, The Spectator, Volume 130, Number 4787 (31 March 1923), p.551.

B.23.
‘Advice’, The London Mercury, Volume VIII, Number 43, (May 1923), p.10.

B.24.
‘Thoughts of New England’, ‘New Year’s Eve’, ‘Old Tale’, ‘The Cloud’,
‘Smudgy Dawn’, ‘Tobacco’ and ‘Brimscombe’, The London Mercury, Volume
IX, Number 51 (January 1924), pp.232-237.

B.25.
‘Thoughts of New England’, The Literary Digest [USA], Volume 80 (2
February 1924), p.34.

B.26.
‘Schubert’, Music and Letters, Volume VI, Number 2 (April 1925), p.174.

B.27.
‘The Royal Visit’, The Citizen or The Gloucester Journal,
circa April 1926.

    These details are taken from a typescript of the poem now at GA21.26 in the Gurney Archive.

B.28.
‘Beethoven I wronged thee undernoting thus…’, Music and Letters, Volume VIII, Number 2 (April 1927),
p.103.

    An untitled poem printed as the first item in a special Beethoven issue of Music and Letters.

B.29.
‘Darkness has Cheating Swiftness’, ‘Old Thought’, ‘Old Dreams’ and
‘Towards Lillers’, The London Mercury, Volume XXIX, Number 170
(December 1933), pp.103-104.

B.30.
‘The Soaking’, ‘When March Blows’, ‘Robecq Again’, ‘Tea Table’, ‘Early
Spring Dawn’ and ‘When the Body Might Free’, The London Mercury, Volume
XXIX, Number 171 (January 1934), pp.203-204.

B.31.
‘Defiance’, ‘Late May’ and ‘The High Hills have a Bitterness’, The London Mercury, Volume XXX, Number 175 (May 1934), pp.584-585.

B.32.
‘Stars Sliding’, ‘Drachms and Scruples’ and ‘Possessions’, The London Mercury, Volume XXX, Number 178 (August 1934), p.301.

B.33.
‘Poems: by Ivor Gurney’, The Daily Telegraph, 28 December 1937, p.13.

    Includes ‘Bach and the Sentry’, ‘The Battalion is Now ‘On Rest”, ‘The
    Fire Kindled’, ‘From Omiecourt’, ‘Song (‘Only the wanderer’)’, ‘Song
    and Pain’, ‘The Songs I Had’, ‘The Target’ and ‘That County’. Possibly part of I.13 and not a separate publication at all.

B.34.
‘The Hoe Scrapes Earth’ and ‘The Songs I Had’, Music and Letters,
Volume XIX, Number 1 (January 1938), p.1.

    Printed as part of the symposium on Gurney’s life and work. See also I.33, J.4 and K.5.

B.35.
‘Two Unpublished Poems by Ivor Gurney’, The Royal College of Music
Magazine
, Volume XXXIV, Number 2 (Easter Term 1938), p.56.

    Includes ‘Soft Rain’ and ‘Sonnet to J. S. Bach’s Memory’.

B.36.
‘Sonnet to J. S. Bach’s Memory’, The Daily Telegraph, 1938.

    These details are taken from a typescript transcription of the B.35 text of the poem now at GA21.6 in the Gurney Archive. A note appended to the poem reads: ‘Also reprinted in Daily Telegraph Music page. This D.t. [sic] reprint differed in some details from Gurney’s own version because the Music Editor altered the grammer [sic]. M[arion] M[argaret] S[cott]’.

B.37.
Poems by Ivor Gurney: Principally selected from unpublished
manuscripts, with a memoir by Edmund Blunden (London: Hutchinson, 1954).

    A volume of 78 poems, including 12 previously published in periodicals. Dedicated
    to ‘The Memory of Marion M. Scott’.
    Reviews:
    B.37.1. unsigned, ‘Sad Variety’, The Times Literary Supplement, Number 2749 (8 October 1954), p.642.
    B.37.2. G.S. Fraser, ‘Phantoms and Objects’, The New Statesman and Nation, 18 December 1954, p.854.

B.38. Poems of Ivor Gurney 1890-1937, with
an Introduction by Edmund Blunden and a Bibliographical Note by Leonard
Clark (London: Chatto & Windus, 1973).

    A collection of 140 poems, including 12 from B.4 and B.11, 43 from B.37 and 8 previously published in periodicals
    and not reprinted by Blunden. Also includes a portrait of Gurney.
    Reviews:
    B.38.1. unsigned, ‘Hero Betrayed’, The Times Literary Supplement, Number 3730 (21 August 1973), p.996.
    B.38.2. Geoffrey Grigson, ‘Bright Tracks’, The New Statesman, 14 September 1973, pp.55-56.
    B.38.3. Derek Stanford, Books and Bookmen, Volume 19 (November 1973), p.105.
    B.38.4. ‘Critic’, ‘Pick of the Books’, unidentified Gloucestershire newspaper, circa late 1973.
    B.38.5. Patric Dickinson, The London Magazine, Volume 13, Number 12 (March 1974), p.121.
    B.38.6. John Fuller, ‘The Mound and the Hole’, The Listener, Volume 91, Number 2345 (7 March 1974), pp.310-311.
    B.38.7. Humphrey Clucas, ‘Soon Comes Night’, Agenda, Volume 12, Number 2 (Summer 1974), pp.69-76.

B.39. ‘Six Poems by Ivor Gurney’, The Times
Literary Supplement
, Number 3993 (13 October 1978), p.1136.

    Includes ‘Quiet Talk’, ‘Going Out at Dawn’, ‘Changes’, ‘Rainy Midnight, ‘The Change’ and
    ‘Fragment (‘Dewy are the stars’)’. Selected from unpublished
    manuscripts by Geoffrey Grigson and printed opposite I.64.1.

B.40. ‘Ivor Gurney/11 Uncollected Poems:
selected by P. J. Kavanagh’, P.N .Review, Volume 9, Number 3 (1982),
pp.26-27.

    Includes ‘It is Winter’, ‘Where the Mire’, ‘On Somme’, ‘Riez
    Bailleul’, ‘Varennes’, ‘The Two’, ‘On the Night’, ‘The Dark Tree’, ‘The
    Mangel-bury’, ‘The Dream’ and ‘The Depths’. A selection from the
    forthcoming B.42 published in the same issue as P.N. Review as D.1.

B.41. ‘Three Previously Unpublished Poems
by Ivor Gurney’, Poetry Review, Volume 72, Number 3 (September 1982),
pp.54-55.

    Includes ‘The Incense Bearers’, ‘It is Near Toussaints’ and
    ‘Swift and Slow’. Presumably published to coincide with the appearance of B.42.

B.42. Collected Poems of Ivor Gurney,
Chosen, edited and with an Introduction by P. J. Kavanagh (Oxford:
Oxford University Press, 1982)

    292 poems, including 175 from B.37 and
    B.38, 11 not previously reprinted from B.4 and B.11 and 3 previously published only in periodicals.
    Also included are a chronology, textual notes, glossary and maps of France and Gloucestershire.

    Reissued in a revised paperback edition in 1984.
    Reviews and Appreciations:
    B.42.1. Stephen Banfield, ‘Collected Poems of Ivor Gurney’, Music and Letters, Volume 63, Numbers
    1-2 (January/April 1982), pp.107-109.
    B.42.2. C. H. Sisson, ‘A Native of the Place’, P.N. Review, Volume 9, Number 4 (1982), p.62.
    B.42.3. Tracey Warr, ‘Into Line’, Poetry Review, Volume 72, Number 3 (September 1982), pp.69-70.
    B.42.4. Alan Bold, ‘Gurney’s Gift Unwrapped’, The Scotsman, 2 October 1982.
    B.42.5. D. J. Enright, ‘Sanity of a sorely tried mind’, The Observer, 3 October 1982, p.32.
    B.42.6. Peter Levi, ‘Wood-notes wild’, The Spectator, 9 October 1982, pp.26-27.
    B.42.7. David Wright, ‘The Suburban Muse’, The Sunday Telegraph, 10 October 1982.
    B.42.8. Peter Parker, ‘Lunatic and Poet but Never Lover’, Gay News, Number 281, 14-17 October 1982, p.46.
    B.42.9. Andrew Motion, ‘Beaten Down Continually’, The Times Literary Supplement, Number 4150 (15 October 1982), p.1121.
    B.42.10. Robert Nye, ‘He was a Poet’, The Times, 21 October 1982, p.13.
    B.42.11. Michael Ivens, The Democrat, 28 October 1982.
    B.42.12. John Lucas, ‘Night Walker’, The New Statesman, 3 December 1982.
    B.42.13. D. J. Enright and Paul Bailey, ‘Books of the Year’, The Observer, 5 December 1982, p.25.
    B.42.14. Christopher Reid, ‘The Poetry and the Pity’, The Times, 3 February 1983 p.46.
    B.42.15. Donald Davie, ‘Gurney’s Flood’, The London Review of Books, Volume 5, Number 2, 3-16 February 1983, pp.6-7.
    B.42.16. Michael Poole, ‘Bright tracks’, The Listener, Volume 109, Number 2800 (24 February 1983), pp.27-28.
    B.42.17. Noel Woodin, ‘Local Poet’, The London Magazine, Volume 22 (February 1983), pp.105-107.

Part C : Prose

C.1. ‘The Springs of Music’, The
Musical Quarterly
, Volume 8, number 3 (July 1922), pp.319-323.

    An essay on creativity and inspiration first published by a New
    York-based journal. Reprinted in D.3, pp.119-125.

C.2. ‘Sir Charles Villiers Stanford by some
of his pupils’, Music and Letters, Volume V, number 3 (July 1924),
pp.193-207 (p.200).

    Other contributors to this posthumous tribute to Gurney’s old teacher
    at the RCM include Walford Davies, Vaughan Williams, Ireland, Bridge,
    Howells and Thomas Dunhill.

Part D : Letters

D.1. ‘Ivor Gurney/War Letters: selected and
edited by R.K.R. Thornton’, P.N. Review, Volume 9, Number 3 (1982),
pp.28-34.

    A selection of 16 letters written between February 1915 and November
    1918 published to advertise the forthcoming D.2.
    Printed in the same issue of P.N. Review as B.40.

D.2. Ivor Gurney, War Letters: A
Selection
, Edited by R.K.R. Thornton (Ashington & Manchester:
Midnag & Carcanet, 1983).

    A selection of Gurney’s wartime letters covering the period February
    1915 to November 1918, with an introduction, chronology, notes on
    correspondents and a black and white portrait. Reissued in paperback by
    the Hogarth Press in 1984.
    Reviews:
    D.2.1. Marina Warner,’Gurney in the Ranks of Death’, The Times,
    3 February 1983, p.46.
    D.2.2. P.J. Kavanagh, ‘Ivor Gurney: War Letters’, The Spectator,
    Volume 256, Number 8066 (12 February 1983), pp.22-23.
    D.2.3. George Webb, ‘They shared a terrible war: Gentle man…and
    officer’, The Gloucester Journal, 19 March 1983, p.4.
    D.2.4. Kamini Knill,’Hamlet in Khaki’, The Times Educational
    Supplement
    , Number 3485 (15 April 1983), p.32.
    D.2.5. Mick Imlah,’The Artist’s Mind’, Poetry Review, Volume 73,
    Number 2 (June 1983), pp.76-77.
    D.2.6. A.H. Ashe, Durham University Journal, Volume 76, Number 2
    (1984), p.308-311.
    D.2.7. Stephen Banfield, ‘Ivor Gurney: War Letters’, Music and
    Letters
    , Volume 66, Number 2 (1985), pp.128-129.
    See also B.42.14 to B.42.18.

D.3. Anthony Boden Stars in a Dark
Night: The Letters of Ivor Gurney to the Chapman Family
, with a
Foreword by Michael Hurd (Gloucester: Alan Sutton, 1986).

    A collection of letters written between February 1915 and late 1918,
    with an introduction, postscript, photographs and facsimiles of
    postcards and letters.
    Reviews:
    D.3.1. unsigned, ‘Tracking down the genius of Ivor Gurney’, The
    Citizen
    , 1 May 1986, p.43.
    D.3.2. ‘Family Bookshelf: Suggestions by J.H.C. Laker’, The Brecon
    & Radnor Express and Powys County Times
    , 29 May 1986, p.4.
    D.3.3. ‘Reviews by Drew Brodbeck & Brian Little’, Gloucester
    and Avon Life
    , June 1986, p.51.
    D.3.4. R.K.R. Thornton, ‘The Domestic Gurney’, P.N. Review,
    Volume 13, Number 3 (1986), pp.73-74.
    D.3.5. John Drinkwater, ‘Creative genius of rare quality’, The
    Gloucestershire Echo
    , 22 November 1986, p.7.
    D.3.6. Lawrence Sail, ‘Recent Verse’, Stand, Volume 28, Number 3
    (1987), p.75.
    D.3.7. Stephen Banfield, ‘Stars in a Dark Night’, Music and Letters,
    Volume 68, Number 2 (April 1987), p.184.

D.4. ‘Another Day: February 23 1917 to
Marion Scott’, The Guardian, 23 February 1991, p.21.

    An extract from p.138 of D.2, published as part of a
    daily series.

D.5. Ivor Gurney: Collected Letters,
Edited by R.K.R. Thornton (Ashington & Manchester: Midnag &
Carcanet, 1991).

    Gurney’s collected letters from summer 1912 to December 1922,
    incorporating texts from D.2 and D.3
    and new, previously unpublished material. It includes an introduction,
    chronology, biographies of correspondents and a map of France.
    Reviews:
    D.5.1. Anthony Burgess, ‘Stuck in a muddy and musical landscape’, The
    Independent
    , 8 February 1991, p.21.
    D.5.2. Roderic Dunnett, ‘Songs of torment’, The Scotsman Weekend,
    16 February 1991.
    D.5.3. Donald Davie, ‘A private pact with the armies of Kaiser Bill’, The
    Independent on Sunday
    , 17 February 1991.
    D.5.4. Paul Fussell, ‘Run wild letters’, The Observer, 17
    February 1991, p.58.
    D.5.5. Nicholas Moseley, ‘Exquisite carnage’, The Sunday Telegraph,
    17 February 1991.
    D.5.6. D.J. Enright, ‘Swift radiant morning’, The London Review of
    Books
    , Volume 13, Number 4 (21 February 1991), pp.12-13.
    D.5.7. Roy Palmer, ‘Tragic poet soldiers on’, The Birmingham Post,
    21 February 1991.
    D.5.8. Alan Bold, ‘Tragedy of a man sadly “sane in his insanity”‘, The
    Glasgow Herald
    , 23 February 1991, p.29.
    D.5.9. P.J. Kavanagh, ‘Hardly a falute’, The Spectator,
    Volume 266, Number 8484 (23 February 1991), p.32.
    D.5.10. Robert Nye, ‘War;s truth, told from the asylum’, The
    Guardian
    , 28 February 1991, p.25.
    D.5.11. Roderic Dunnett, ‘Letters from a curious genius’, The
    Financial Times
    , circa February 1991.
    D.5.12. Tony Gould, ‘Unquiet on the western front’, The Sunday
    Times Magazine
    , 3 March 1991, p.69.
    D.5.13. Andrew Motion, ‘Kinetic Elegy’, The London Evening Standard,
    14 March 1991.
    D.5.14. John Lucas, ‘From Severn to Somme’, The Times Literary
    Supplement
    , Number 4621 (25 October 1991), pp.3-5 and cover, which
    features a portrait of Gurney and the headline ‘The Liberation of Ivor
    Gurney’.
    D.5.15. Trevor Hold, ‘Ordinary desirings’, The Musical Times,
    Volume 133, Number 1788 (February 1992), pp.78-79.

D.6. R.K.R. Thornton, ‘New Howells-Gurney
Papers’, The Ivor Gurney Society Journal, Number 1 (August 1995),
pp.69-76.

    A bibliographic description of a new deposition in the Gurney Archive
    at Gloucester Library. It includes transcriptions of two letters and a
    postcard sent by Gurney to Herbert Howells in 1918, a comic note
    written by Gurney in 1919 and selections from letters to and about him,
    as well as commentaries on manuscript poems and annotations made by him
    in his books. All this material is previously unpublished.

D.7. ‘”My True Work Now”: An unpublished
Ivor Gurney Letter’, The Ivor Gurney Society Journal, Volume 3
(1997), pp.57-74.

    A recently discovered letter to Marion Scott, written in July 1919 and
    containing thirteen previously unpublished poems.

D.8. ‘An Unpublished Letter from Ivor
Gurney to Gervase Elwes’, edited by Valerie Langfield, The Ivor
Gurney Society Journal
, Volume 5 (1999), pp.7-10.

    Analysis and contextualisation of a previously unpublished and undated
    letter by Gurney, dating it between the 16th and 22nd November 1920.

D.9. ‘A New Ivor Gurney Letter to Lascelles
Abercrombie’, edited by R.K.R. Thornton, The Ivor Gurney Society
Journal
, Volume 6 (2000), pp.89-92.

    Discussion of a newly-discovered letter by Gurney to the poet Lascelles
    Abercrombie. A privately-owned letter from April 1919, which fills in
    details of the relationship between the two poets.

See also E.39 which includes a
previously unpublished asylum letter.

Part E : Anthologies featuring Gurney’s work

E.1. The Muse in Arms: A Collection of
War Poems, for the most part written in the field of action, by Seamen,
Soldiers, and Flying Men who are serving, or have served in the Great
War
, Edited and with an Introduction by E. B. Osborn (London: John
Murray, 1917).

    Includes ‘Strange Service’ (p.14), ‘To the Poet Before Battle’ (p.30),
    ‘To Certain Comrades’ (p.130) and ‘Afterwards’ (p.152). The first
    appearance of Gurney’s poems in book-form. See D.5,
    p.412, for his opinion of the book as a whole.

E.2. unknown, edited by John Sampson
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1918).

    Includes ‘The Fire Kindled’ and ‘Strange Service’. These details are
    taken from a list at GA5.3e. in the Gurney Archive headed ‘Ivor Gurney
    in Anthologies, &c’ and signed by Frank Sidgwick of Sidgwick &
    Jackson. As he notes, ‘We do not always know the title of an anthology,
    since applications are usually made to us before the title is decided’
    and, as this is only a list of permissions granted, it may be that some
    of its contents were never published.

E.3. Selections from Modern Poets,
Made by J. C. Squire (London: Martin Secker, 1921).

    Includes ‘To the Poet Before Battle’ and ‘Song of Pain and Beauty’
    (pp.249-250).

E.4. Second Selections from Modern Poets,
Made by J. C. Squire (London: Martin Secker, 1924).

    Includes ‘Thoughts of New England’, ‘Smudgy Dawn’ and ‘Dawn’
    (pp.215-222). ‘Dawn’ was originally printed as the second half of
    ‘Smudgy Dawn’ in B.24.

E.5. A Miscellany of Artistic Songs
(London: Boosey & Co., 1925).

    Includes ‘Sleep’.

E.6. Fifty Modern English Songs.
Selected by and Published for The Society of English Singers

(London: Boosey & Co., [1925]).

    Includes ‘I will go with my father a ploughing’ (p.79) and ‘Carol of
    the Skiddaw Yowes’ (p.173).

E.7. [Omitted in TAB].

E.8. Selections from Modern Poets:
Complete Edition – First and Second Series
, Made by J. C. Squire
(London: Martin Secker, 1927)

    A single volume reprint of E.3 and E.4.

E.9. Great Poems of the English
Language. An Anthology of Verse in English from Chaucer to the moderns
,
Edited by Wallace Alvin Briggs (New York: R.M. McBride & Co., 1927
& London: G.G. Harrap , 1928).

    Includes ‘To the Poet Before Battle’.

E.10.
Fiery Grains: Thoughts and Sayings for Some Occasions, put
together by H.R.L. Sheppard and H.P. Marshall (London, New York,
Toronto: Longmans, Green & Co., 1928).

    Includes ‘Song of Pain and Beauty’ (p.127). An anthology of devotional
    and inspirational poetry and prose compiled by two senior clergymen.
    Gurney’s poem is part of a section entitled ‘For Peace of Mind’.

E.11.
An Anthology of War Poems, Compiled by Frederick Brereton;
Introduction by Edmund Blunden (London: W. Collins, Sons & Co.
Ltd., 1930)

    Includes ‘To the Poet Before Battle’ and ‘Song of Pain and Beauty’
    (pp.82-83).

E.12.
Jewels of Song, Compiled by W.H. Davies (London: Jonathan Cape,
1930).

    Includes ‘Song of Pain and Beauty’ (p.113). Reissued by the same
    publishers in 1938 as An Anthology of Short Poems.

E.13.
The Mercury Book of Verse: Being a Selection of Poems published in
The London Mercury, 1919-1930
, with an Introduction by Sir Henry
Newbolt (London: Macmillan & Co., 1931).

    Includes ‘Tobacco’ and ‘Encounters’ (pp.130-131).

E.14.
Younger Poets of Today, Selected by J.C. Squire (London: Martin
Secker, 1932).

    Includes ‘Encounters’ and ‘Tobacco’ (pp.219-220). Reissued by the same
    publishers as Third Selections from Modern Poets in 1934.

E.15.
unknown, published by the London University Press in 1935.

    Includes ‘Song of Pain and Beauty’. Another item noted in Frank
    Sidgwick’s list of anthology republications noted in E.2.

E.16.
Landmarks: A Book of Topographical Verse For England and Wales,
Chosen by George Rostrevor Hamilton and John Arlott (Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press,1943).

    Includes ‘The Fire Kindled’ (p.92). Gurney’s poem is included in the
    section on Gloucestershire. Reissued in a revised version as E.44.

E.17.
Baritone Songs, Compiled, Edited and Arranged by Sydney Northcote
(London & New York: Boosey & Hawkes Ltd., 1950).

    Includes ‘The Bonnie Earl of Murray’ (p.120).

E.18.
Tenor Songs, Compiled, Edited and Arranged by Sydney Northcote
(London & New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1950).

    Includes ‘Sleep’.

E.19.
Georgian Poets, Selected by Alan Pryce-Jones (London: Edward
Hulton, 1959).

    Includes ‘Dawn’ (p.27). ‘Dawn’ is the text printed by J. C. Squire in
    E.4 and E.8. Issued as part of Edward Hulton’s Pocket Poets series.

E.20.
Georgian Poetry, Selected and introduced by James Reeves
(Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1962).

    Includes ‘Townshend’, ‘Robecq Again’ (pp.113-114) and a biographical
    note (p.159).

E.21.
Men Who March Away: Poems of the First World War, Edited with an
Introduction by I. M. Parsons (London: Chatto & Windus, 1965).

    Includes ‘The Silent One’ (p.60), ‘The Bohemians’ (p.76), ‘To His Love’
    (p.153) and a biographical note (p.188).

E.22.
Poetry in English 1900-1930, Selected by John F. Sullivan (London:
Edward Arnold Ltd., 1965).

    Includes ‘The Fire Kindled’, ‘The Bohemians’, ‘War Books’ and a short
    biographical introduction (pp.93-95). Gurney’s poems are included in
    the section of the book devoted to war poetry.

E.23.
Poetry of the First World War, Edited by Maurice Hussey (London:
Longmans, Green & Co. Ltd., 1967).

    Includes ‘To the Poet Before Battle’ (p.x), ‘West Country’ (p.11),
    ‘Servitude’ (p.71), ‘The Target’ (p.71), ‘Dirge for Two Striplings’,
    ‘War Books’, ‘Ypres’, ‘Picture of Two Veterans’ and ‘When I Am Covered’
    (pp.154-157). This anthology represents the first publication of ‘Dirge
    for Two Striplings’, ‘Picture of Two Veterans’ and ‘Ypres’, reprinted
    in B.49. ‘Picture of Two Veterans’ is also included in B.45.

E.24.
Sound of Battle, Edited by Leonard Clark (Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1969).

    Includes ‘The Silent One’ (p.128).

E.25.
From Other Lands: Poetry that makes History live, Edited
by Al Hine (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1969).

    Includes ‘Ypres’. Probably, like Hine’s other publications, intended
    for children.

E.26.
1914-18 in Poetry, An anthology, Selected and edited by E.
L. Black (London: London University Press, 1970).

    Includes ‘To His Love’ (p.88) and a biographical note (p.145). Reissued
    under the Hodder & Stoughton Educational imprint in 1986.

E.27.
W. H. Auden, A Certain World: A Commonplace Book (London: Faber
and Faber, 1971).

    Includes ‘The High Hills’ (p.105), ‘Kilns’ (p.209) and ‘Larches’ (p.
    218).

E.28.
The Oxford Book of Twentieth Century Verse, Chosen by Philip Larkin
(London: Oxford University Press, 1973).

    Includes ‘Strange Hells’ (p.264).

E.29.
The Faber Book of Twentieth Century Verse, Edited by John Heath
Stubbs and David Wright (3rd Edition: London: Faber and Faber, 1975).

    Includes ‘Canadians’ (p.133) and ‘Requiem’ (p.133).

E.30.
A Heritage of Twentieth Century British Song: Volume 1 (London:
Boosey & Hawkes, 1977).

    Includes ‘Carol of the Skiddaw Yowes’, ‘I will go with my father a
    ploughing’ and ‘Spring’.

E.31.
The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry, Edited with an
Introduction by Jon Silkin (London & Harmondsworth: Allen Lane
& Penguin Books, 1979).

    Includes ‘To His Love, ‘The Silent One’, ‘The Bohemians’, ‘War Books’
    and ‘Strange Hells’ (pp.111-114). The second edition, published as a
    Penguin paperback in 1981, also includes ‘Butchers and Tombs’ (p.117)
    and ‘It is Near Toussaints’ (p.119) and quotes the first line of
    ‘Strange Hells’ on the back cover.

E.32.
The Batsford Book of Country Verse, Edited by Samuel Carr (London:
B. T. Batsford Ltd., 1979).

    Includes ‘The Wood of August’ (p.73) and ‘Larches’ (p.94).

E.33.
The Faber Book of Poems and Places, Edited with an Introduction by
Geoffrey Grigson (London: Faber and Faber, 1980).

    Includes ‘The High Hills’, ‘Possessions’, ‘Dawns I Have Seen’, ‘Song:
    Severn Meadows’ [i.e. ‘Song (“Only the Wanderer”)’] and ‘Elver Fishermen on the Severn: Two Gloucestershire Fragments’ (pp.125-127). This anthology represents the first publication of ‘Dawns I Have Seen’, reprinted in B.49, and ‘Elver
    Fishermen on the Severn’. The latter consists of ‘Rainy Midnight’ and a
    shorter unpublished fragment: ‘The white faces are lit below the high
    bank, | Deadwood on the brown ledge fishermen made, | The night around
    tempers to another shade.’

E.34.
The Oxford Book of War Poetry, Chosen and Edited by Jon
Stallworthy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984).

    Includes ‘To His Love’, ‘Ballad of the Three Spectres’ and ‘The Silent
    One’ (pp.181-182).

E.35.
Sing Solo Baritone (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985).

    Includes ‘An Epitaph’.

E.36.
The Oxford Book of Short Poems, Chosen and Edited by P. J.
Kavanagh and James Michie (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985).

    Includes ‘After War’, ‘On the Night’, ‘The Escape’, and ‘Moments’
    (pp.210-211).

E.37.
The Pity of War: Poems of the First World War, Selected with an
Introduction by Jill Balcon; Preface by Edward Carpenter; calligraphy
by Rosamund Grossman; illustrations by Barrington Barber (London:
Shepherd & Walwyn, 1985).

    Includes ‘To the Poet Before Battle’ and ‘First Time In’ (pp.26-27).

E.38.
Poetry of the Great War: An Anthology, Edited by Dominic Hibberd
and John Onions (London: Macmillan, 1986).

    Includes ‘To England – A Note’ (p.54), ‘The Silent One’ (p.78), ‘Riez
    Bailleul’ (p.103), ‘The Target’ (p.129), ‘To the Prussians of England’
    (p.145), ‘First Time In’ (p.145), ‘Mist on Meadows’ (p.183), ‘War
    Books’ (p.189) and a biographical note (p.218). Gurney is discussed in
    the introduction and there are also explanatory notes to individual poems.

E.39.
From Parry to Britten: British Music in Letters 1900-1945, edited
by Lewis Foreman (London: B. T. Batsford Ltd., 1987).

    Includes letters from Gurney to Herbert Howells taken from D.2 on pp.87 and 90-91, a 1918 letter from Howells to
    Gurney on p.89 and a 1939 letter from Howells to Marion Scott
    concerning the proofs of A.32 and A.33
    on p.223. It also contains an otherwise unpublished asylum letter from
    Gurney to Marion Scott circa 1924 (pp.207-208) largely concerned with
    ‘the Football score. (Sunday)’, British and German history and
    topography and authors that Gurney is reading.

E.40.
In Time of War, edited by Anne Harvey (London: Blackie and Son,
1987).

    Includes ‘The Target’ (p.30) and a biographical note (p.142). An
    anthology of First and Second World War poetry aimed at younger
    readers, illustrated with woodcuts and poster reproductions in black
    and white. Reissued as a Penguin paperback in 1989 and a Puffin
    paperback in 1995. The first line of ‘The Target’ is quoted on the back
    cover of the Puffin edition.

E.41.
Never Such Innocence: A New Anthology of Great War Verse, Edited
and Introduced by Martin Stephen (London: Buchan & Enright, 1988).

    Includes ‘Crucifix Corner’ (p.128), ‘I Saw French Once’ (p.134) and a
    biographical note (p.337). Reissued as an Everyman paperback in 1991.

E.42.
Robert Giddings, The War Poets: The Lives and Writings of the
1914-1918 War Poets
(London: Bloomsbury, 1988).

    Includes ‘To the Poet Before Battle’ (p.68), ‘Pain’ (p.69), ‘To His
    Love’ (p.82), ‘Strange Hells’ (p.129), ‘The Silent One’ (p.130) and
    ‘War Books’ (p.173). A selection of First World War poetry interspersed
    with commentary in which Gurney receives extensive mention. Illustrated
    with contemporary cartoons, prints and paintings.

E.43.
Poetry of the First World War, Selected by Edward Hudson (Hove:
Wayland, 1988).

    Includes ‘Ballad of the Three Spectres’ (p.55), ‘The Target’ (p.109)
    and a biographical note (p.122). Illustrated with black and white
    photographs.

E.44.
The Coloured Counties: Poems of Place in England and Wales,
Selected and with an Introduction by John Arlott (London: J. M. Dent
& Sons Ltd., 1988).

    Includes ‘The Fire Kindled’ (p.124). A revised version of E.16.

E.45.
Lads: Love Poetry of the Trenches, Edited by Martin Taylor
(London: Constable, 1989).

    Includes ‘First Time In’ (p.78), ‘Photographs’ (p.79), ‘The Estaminet’
    (p.83), ‘”Hark, hark, the lark”‘ (p.132), ‘Dicky’ (p.175), ‘To His
    Love’ (p.181), ‘Toasts and Memories’ (p.190), ‘The Mangel-bury’ (p.204),
    ‘Farewell’ (p.212), ‘Strange Hells’ (p.214) and a biographical note
    (p.235). Gurney is also discussed in the introduction.

E.46.
Ill at Ease: Writers on Ailments Real and Imagined, edited by D.
J. Enright (London: Faber and Faber, 1989).

    Includes ‘To God’ (p.295). Also issued with the alternative title The
    Faber Book of Fevers and Frets
    .

E.47.
The Penguin Book of First World War Prose, Edited with an
Introduction by Jon Glover and Jon Silkin (Harmondsworth: Viking Books,
1989), pp. 411-422.

    Selections from nineteen letters from D.2, beginning
    in February 1915 and ending with Gurney’s suicide note of June 1918,
    with a brief biographical introduction (pp.411-422).

E.48.
The Faber Book of Vernacular Verse, Edited by Tom Paulin (London:
Faber and Faber, 1990).

    Includes ‘First Time In’ (pp.46-47) and ‘Felling a Tree’ (pp.332-336).

E.49.
Poetry of the World Wars, Edited by Michael Foss (London: Michael
O’Mara Books, 1990).

E.50.
Elected Friends: Poems for and about Edward Thomas, Compiled by
Anne Harvey with an Introduction by Vernon Scannell (London: Enitharmon
Press, 1991).

    Includes ‘The Poets of my County’ and ‘The Mangel-bury’. See also N.17.

E.51.
Shades of Green, Poems chosen by Anne Harvey; Illustrated by John Lawrence (London: Julia Mac Rae Books, 1991).

    Includes ‘Hedger’ (p.84). Gurney’s poem is part of the ‘Flower-lovers and Weed-lovers’ section of this anthology, which describes itself as being ‘dedicated to the green spirit’.

E.52.
Forest and Vale and High Blue Hill: Poems of Gloucestershire, the Cotswolds and Beyond, Selected by Johnny Coppin with Wood
Engravings by Ray Hedger (Gloucestershire: The Windrush Press, 1991).

    Includes ‘There Was Such Beauty’ (p.13), ‘The Fisherman of Newnham’
    (p.16), ‘The Incense Bearers’ (p.27), ‘East Wind’ (p.39), ‘Cotswold
    Ways’ (p.43), ‘Up There’ (p.49), ‘Quiet Talk’ (p.54), ‘Old Martinmas
    Eve’ (p.69) and ‘The High Hills’ (p.91).

E.53.
The War Poets: An Anthology, Selected by Michael Wylie (Norwich:
Jarrold Press, 1992).

    Includes ‘The Retreat’, ‘Near Vermand’, ‘Requiem’, ‘Pain’, ‘Servitude’,
    and ‘To the Poet Before Battle’ (pp.42-45). Issued in a pocket edition
    as part of The Jarrold Poets series.

E.54.
Some Corner of a Foreign Field: Poetry of the Great War, Edited by
James Bentley (London & Toronto: Little, Brown & Co, 1992).

    Includes ‘To His Love’ (p.23), ‘First Time In’ (p.34), ‘The Silent One’
    (p.61) and a biographical note (p.114). Illustrated with decorations
    and contemporary paintings.

E.55.
Robert Giddings, Echoes of War: Portraits of War from the Fall of
Troy to the Gulf
(London: Bloomsbury, 1992).

    Includes ‘The Silent One’ (p.250). A selection of writing about warfare
    with a critical commentary which includes brief details of Gurney’s
    life.

E.56.
Between the Severn and the Wye: Poems of the Border Counties of
England and Wales
, Selected by Johnny Coppin with Wood Engravings by
Ray Hedger (Gloucestershire: The Windrush Press, 1993).

    Includes ‘Song (“Only the wanderer”)’ (p.95), ‘Tewkesbury’ (p.97), an
    extract from ‘The Old City – Gloucester’ (p.99) and ‘The Lock Keeper’
    (p.106).

E.57.
The Norton Anthology of English Literature Volume 2 (6th Edition.
New York and London: W. W. Norton & Co, 1993).

    Includes ‘To His Love’, ‘Toward Lillers’, ‘The Silent One’, ‘December
    30th’ and a biographical and critical introduction (pp.1835-1838). Gurney’s poems were also included in the fifth edition, published in 1986.

E.58.
The Poetry Please! Book of Favourite Poems, Edited by Susan
Roberts (London: BBC Books, 1993).

    Includes ‘Up There’ (p.71). An anthology of poems chosen by guests on
    BBC Radio 4’s Poetry Please! programme. ‘Up There’ is the choice of the actor David Goodland, who has played Gurney on several ocassions; see N.11, N.13
    and N.14.

E.59.
Green and Pleasant Land: A Thousand Years of Poetry, Selected by
Diana Saville (Hereford: Robert Ditchfield Ltd. for W.H. Smiths
Exclusive Books series, 1993).

    Includes ‘Strange Hells’ (p.249) and a short biographical note (p.261).

E.60.
The Marginalia Book of Composers’ Letters, Edited by Jan Fielden
(London: The Marginalia Press, 1994).

    Includes a letter of February 1917 from Gurney to Herbert Howells
    (pp.169-170), originally printed in D.5 on
    pp.208-209.

E.61.
Wales at War, Edited by John Richards (Cardiff: University of
Wales Press, 1994).

E.62.
Simon Featherstone, War Poetry: An Introductory Reader (London:
Routledge, 1995).

    Includes ‘Strange Service’, ‘De Profundis’, ‘Strange Hells’, ‘First
    Time In’, ‘The Silent One’, ‘Swift and Slow’, ‘The Mangel-bury’, ‘While
    I Write’ and a biographcal note (pp.119-125). Issued as part of
    Routledge’s Critical Readers in Theory and Practice series. Gurney’s
    poetry is the subject of extensive critical discussion throughout.

E.63.
The Wordsworth Book of First World War Poetry, Selected, with an Introduction and Bibliography, by Marcus Clapham (Ware:
Wordsworth Editions Ltd, 1995).

    Includes ‘Ballad of Three Spectres’, ‘To His Love’, ‘The Silent One’, ‘The Bohemians’, ‘War Books’ and ‘Strange Hells’ (pp.30-35).